Could abortion be restored in Oklahoma in the name of religion?

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Could abortion be reinstated in Oklahoma in the name of religion? Despite a variety of legal challenges, abortion remains completely prohibited in several states across the country. Experts said this new challenge appears to follow a strategy used by Christian conservatives. say your baby is incompatible with life and we can’t help you,” said Kentucky plaintiff Jessica Kalb. Three Kentucky Jewish women are part of a lawsuit against their state, arguing that Jewish law clearly states that life begins at birth. Consequently, their religious rights are violated. “My freedom to practice my religion has been stolen. Kentucky’s abortion laws are cruel and they must be reversed,” said Kentucky plaintiff Lisa Sobel. The women, in that case, argued abortion laws in their state are unclear about IVF treatment, a criticism that has also been leveled at Oklahoma’s laws, though lawmakers argue that abortion treatments IVF are allowed. involved finding plaintiffs who are willing to put their name to the complaint,” Telman said. Jeremy Telman, a law professor at Oklahoma City University, said the strategy used in Kentucky has been used before. ” I think if one wanted to be uncharitable, it looks like this is an attempt by progressives to use religion to push back legislation, just as they’ve seen conservative Christians use religion to push back legislation they don’t like,” Telman said. Telman al added religious beliefs therefore carry a lot of weight when it comes to legal arguments. If these women can prove that their beliefs are violated, they could succeed.

Could abortion be restored in Oklahoma in the name of religion?

Abortion advocates in other states that have banned abortion are now using a religious liberty defense in court. Despite various legal challenges, abortion remains completely banned in several states across the country.

Experts said this new challenge appears to follow a strategy used by Christian conservatives.

“My biggest fear is that I get pregnant and I get a CT scan and they say your baby is incompatible with life and we can’t help you,” said Jessica Kalb, a plaintiff from Kentucky.

Three Kentucky Jewish women are part of a lawsuit against their state, arguing that Jewish law clearly states that life begins at birth. Consequently, their religious rights are violated.

“My freedom to practice my religion has been stolen. Kentucky’s abortion laws are cruel and they must be reversed,” said Kentucky plaintiff Lisa Sobel.

The women in this case argued that their state’s abortion laws are unclear about IVF treatment, a criticism that has also been leveled at Oklahoma’s laws, although lawmakers argue that IVF treatments are permitted.

“I think Oklahoma’s laws are likely to address similar challenges. It’s just a matter of organizations that are involved finding plaintiffs who are willing to put their name to the complaint,” Telman said.

Jeremy Telman, a law professor at Oklahoma City University, said the strategy used in Kentucky had been used before.

“I think if one were to be uncharitable, it looks like an attempt by progressives to use religion to push back legislation, just as they’ve seen conservative Christians use religion to push back legislation that ‘they don’t like it,’ Telman said. .

Telman also added that religious beliefs carry a lot of weight when it comes to legal arguments. If these women can prove that their beliefs are violated, they could succeed.

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