Nebraska Religious Organizations Welcome SCOTUS School Voucher Ruling

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For more than a decade, Clarice Jackson has been at the forefront, pushing for school choice in Nebraska. so if a parent makes the decision to send their child to a religious school, that’s their choice,” Jackson said. The high court ruled that Maine’s tuition assistance program for private schools was unconstitutional because it excluded religious schools. religion, Chief Justice John Roberts wrote in the majority opinion. However, Judge Sonia Sotomayor and two other judges dissented, wondering “where” that court would be headed next. “This court continues to dismantle the wall of separation between church and state that the founders fought to build,” Sotomayor.Gov wrote. Pete Ricketts applauded the decision. “I think the Supreme Court is right because it clearly discriminated against religious institutions. And our founders never intended our religion to be separated from our public life,” Ricketts said. Zach Heiden, chief attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union of Maine, said the ruling overturned two decades of lower court rulings. Constitution,” Heiden said. The decision does not directly affect Nebraska because it is one of two states that currently does not allow taxpayer money to help parents pay for private school tuition. “We’re just against the good guys,” Nebraska State Education Association president Jenni Benson said. we are very concerned about the use of public funds for institutions that have the ability to choose the students they serve,” Benson said. Jenni Benson says Nebraska already ranks near the bottom of the nation when it comes to public funding for public schools. “To say we could fund two separate institutions is, that’s crazy,” Benson said. “Public education will be fine and needs to be supported,” State Sen. Lou Ann Linehan said. students. This measure fell short of five votes to break the filibuster in the last session. “And the fact that it removes any constitutional question from the debate. I think that’s very helpful,” Linehan said. afford to move or send their children to private schools should have a choice of school. “I won’t be the only one introducing school legislation next year. I anticipate there will be several bills,” Linehan said. Tom Venzor of the Nebraska Catholic Conference thinks the High Court ruling opens the door to school choice. will include scholarship tax credit programs and college savings accounts and other opportunities. So yeah, it’s a big moment, a historic moment,” Venzor said. “What we’re saying is funding shouldn’t be split between public schools, public money is where it’s going. And we’re not going to back down from that,” Benson said.

For more than a decade, Clarice Jackson has been at the forefront, pushing for school choice in Nebraska.

She sees on Tuesday United States Supreme Court decision on a school voucher program in Maine as a monumental step in the right direction.

“It’s educational freedom. And so if a parent makes the decision to send their child to a religious school, that’s their choice,” Jackson said.

The high court ruled that Maine’s tuition assistance program for private schools was unconstitutional because it excluded religious schools.

“This is discrimination against religion,” Chief Justice John Roberts wrote in the majority opinion.

However, Judge Sonia Sotomayor and two other judges dissented, wondering “where” that court would be headed next.

“This court continues to dismantle the wall of separation between church and state that the founders fought to build,” Sotomayor wrote.

Governor Pete Ricketts applauded the decision.

“I think the Supreme Court is right because it clearly discriminated against religious institutions. And our founders never intended our religion to be separated from our public life,” Ricketts said.

Zach Heiden, chief attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union of Maine, said the decision reversed two decades of lower court rulings.

“People who can see this as a victory are missing the big picture. The constitution is there to protect us all and that includes all of the provisions of the Constitution,” Heiden said.

The decision does not directly affect Nebraska because it is one of two states that currently does not allow taxpayer money to help parents pay for private school tuition.

“We’re just against the good guys,” Nebraska State Education Association president Jenni Benson said.

She said public funds should only go to public schools because they provide every student with equal access and opportunity and cannot discriminate.

“One of the main reasons we’re very concerned about the use of public funds is for institutions that have the ability to choose the students they serve,” Benson said.

Jenni Benson says Nebraska already ranks near the bottom of the nation when it comes to public funding for public schools.

“To say we could fund two separate institutions is, that’s crazy,” Benson said.

“Public education will be fine and needs to be supported,” State Sen. Lou Ann Linehan said.

Linehan said she was pleased with the decision and plans to reintroduce a bill that would provide tax credits to private school scholarship donors for low-income students.

This measure missed five votes to break a buccaneer in the last session.

“And the fact that it removes any constitutional question from the debate. I think that’s very helpful,” Linehan said.

She does not believe that only parents who can afford to move or send their children to private schools should have choice of school.

“I won’t be the only one introducing school legislation next year. I anticipate there will be several bills,” Linehan said.

Tom Venzor of the Nebraska Catholic Conference thinks the High Court decision opens the door to school choice.

“I can guarantee with the Carson v. Makin case that more families will come to the table wanting stronger opportunities for school choice, and that will include scholarship tax credit programs and college savings accounts and other opportunities. So yeah, this is a big moment, a historic moment,” Venzor said.

Benson said 90% of students attend public schools and a majority of Nebraskans support their public schools.

“What we’re saying is funding shouldn’t be split between public schools, public money is where it’s going. And we’re not going to back down from that,” Benson said.

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